The Zombies Ate My Brains

Rescuing what might remain of the grey matter.

Graphite for Moo

Graphite 465_001 Graphite 465_004 Graphite 465_005 Graphite 465_007

For Moo

This may not be the largest graphite specimen in the world…

but it is one of the largest graphite balls!

Balls of Graphite in calcite matrix from Gooderham, Ontario

The overall specimen measures 3.5 x 3.0 x 2.5 cm

The largest ball measures 0.5 cm

The balls are composed of micro crystals of graphite.

Dr. John A. Jaszczak is crazy nuts for graphite.

His website has a ton of information on graphite from the same location as this specimen.

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Categories: It's a Hobby, Mineral Collecting, Photography

Tags: , , , ,

24 replies

  1. Maggie, I am so envious if your collection. Guess next I’ll post a few petrified wood pictures. We’re near the painted desert and Meteor Crater. Maybe I’ll take a few pictures of the meteors we’ve found—both on our land.

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  2. She says “Thank you” and “It’s pretty.”
    We are amazed that it grows in balls. The site you directed us to has one that looks like diamonds and one that looks like our cat’s nose! Thanks so much!

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  3. I don’t see the pic, Maggie. [sob !]

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  4. This one looks most unusual with the light and dark nestled together! 🙂

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  5. Is that an infected rock pimple?? Eww.

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  6. Talk about weird … but strangely compelling. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I had no idea that graphite occurred like this. Of course, all I’ve ever known about graphite is that it’s found in pencils and lubricants.

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  8. I had no idea that graphite grew in balls like that! My first reaction was that it looked like a cancer growth – I like your version better 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Don’t know what Freud would say, although can imagine, but I LOVE in- and ex-trusions, whether they be Gettysburg cannonballs held partway in tree trunks, your marvelous sample here–it’s beautiful, Maggie, and beautifully photographed–or an amazing glass sculpture I saw at the Corning Glass Museum in NY.

    Thank you!

    (Hope that Flickr link works–never tried those–prob’ly should make an Instagram acct and copy stuff there, huh?)

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