Maggie Wilson Author

Historical Non-Fiction in Northern Ontario

Vanity, thy Name…

I stole the heading from my Caroline Maben Flower article. Vanity, thy Name… was the working title for the chapter that described her meeting artist Herman Kiekebusch in October, 1895. The landscape painter was born in Berlin 1857 and worked in Norway, Germany, and other alpine countries. She posed for one of his other works, and then he began a portrait of her. About two months later, Caroline and Kiekebusch […]

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Candyass vs Badass

Spring is up to her usual tricks in these parts. Snow/sun, freeze/thaw. The winds are bitter cold except when the sun breaks through the clouds. Then I feel like that character from the Aesop’s fable. The one about the contest between the sun and the wind and who could compel the traveler to take off his coat. Yesterday was day three of the same weather pattern. The weather kept me […]

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There’s a But

Ms. Bean asked the question, “Which Three personality Traits are Helping you Deal with Today?” I replied, “I am pragmatic, perceptive (like you) and empathetic. At the beginning of all of “this” I was able to keep my head, sympathize when required, and in general I was somewhat removed from all of the hysteria. But. I have a front row seat, so to speak, to the shitshow that is underway […]

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Things that are Things 2020

Dill Pickle Soup I called a friend the other night to check up on her – she’s in her 80s and is staying inside where it’s safe. She has an excellent support circle in her community and has all she needs. Including her dinner that evening – homemade dill pickle soup. “Dill pickle soup is a thing?” I asked her. “It’s a delicious thing,” she said. I’ll take her word […]

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Horatio Barber and his Cobalt Co-Star J.H. Hunter

Originally posted on Horatio Claude Barber:
Horatio Barber had business partnerships with several men during his two years in Ontario. In Cobalt, he ran a stock exchange, and in Larder Lake, he established a branch office of his Toronto brokerage, Canada Mines. In the first installment of the Co-Stars series, we featured Mr. Browne and Mr. Moore, two Cobalt men who came to the region to take advantage of business…

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Horatio Barber and his Cobalt Co-Stars Browne and Moore

Life is ticking along, more or less normally for this introvert. Who is doing what she normally does in remote Northern Ontario where time is spent at a social distance from just about everyone. It’s status quo. Except for the Sword of Damocles pointed at each and every one of us around the globe. So, with a healthy dose of denial, I hereby present to you, today’s blog post from my other site, Horatio Claude Barber.

Horatio Claude Barber

While researching Horatio Claude Barber, we uncovered several interesting stories related to his associates. This is the first in a series that features the people who played a supporting role in his Canadian career as a stockbroker in Cobalt and Larder Lake.

Cobalt Co-Stars Browne and Moore

Barber’s company, the Cobalt Open Call Mining Exchange opened in April, 1906. He was a director along with R.H.C. Browne; C. H. Moore of Cobalt and J.H.  Hunter of Cincinnati were charter members of the exchange.

Magistrate and publisher R H C Browne on the left with Imperial Bank manager F H Marsh, ca 1907

We don’t know too much about Robert H.C. Browne. He was the first editor and owner of the Cobalt Nugget as well as a life insurance agent. Perhaps most significantly, considering the “shady” nature of Barber’s projects, Browne was the police magistrate. He was also a mining.[1] man…

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Silas Beebe 1849 – 1938

Who was Silas Beebe?  That is a very good question. It’s one I asked myself over and over as I poured through Caroline Pugh Maben Flower’s letters and diary entries. Sprinkled throughout were references to a man, someone with whom she had a romantic relationship before she left for Berlin in 1895. For example: “I’m staying in tonight to write to Silas”, “Mr. B left for Portland”, “…wrote to B […]

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